Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
January 17, Wednesday 2018 6:40 AM       

       HEADLINES: DYFI activist hacked in Thiruvananthapuram                                              Gita Gopinath’s economic advices must be carefully approached: CPI                                              Udayamperoor Neethu murder case: Accused found hanging                                              ‘Joker’ like Uzhavoor is not needed for NCP: Mani C Kappan                                              Vigilance registers FIR against Thomas Chandy                                              SC judge in Loya case breaks down during meeting with CJI                                              SC crisis seems unresolved, will take couple days to settle: AG                                              CJI sets new five-Judge constitution bench, sans four SC judges                                              'Baby Moshe' arrives in Mumbai after nine years                                              Judge Loya death case: Maha govt. submits documents to SC                                              Couple arrested after 13 brothers and sisters held captive                                              Palestinian leaders vote to suspend recognition of Israel                                              Pak provides safe sanctuaries to terrorists: MQM                                              Centurion Test: Rain halts play on third day                                              Khelo India's official anthem released                                              ICC U-19 WC: Roy's fifer helps India crush PNG                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Element 117 officially named 'Tennessine'  
       'Human-made objects on Earth amount to 30 trillion tonnes'
 
         Posted on :19:09:54 Dec 6, 2016
   
A A
       Last edited on:19:09:54 Dec 6, 2016
         Tags: 'Human-made objects on Earth amount to 30 tr
 
LONDON: Earth's technosphere, which comprises of all the structures that humans have constructed to keep them alive on the planet, amounts to an enormous 30 trillion tonnes, a new study has found.
 
Researchers, including those at University of Leicester in the UK, made the first estimate of the sheer size of the physical structure of the planet's technosphere.
 
"The technosphere is a major new phenomenon of this planet - and one that is evolving extraordinarily rapidly," said Professor Mark Williams from University of Leicester.
 
It is comprised of all of the structures that humans have constructed to keep them alive on the planet - from houses, factories and farms to computer systems, smartphones and CDs, to the waste in landfills and spoil heaps.
 
Researchers suggest that the bulk of the planet's technosphere is staggering in scale, with some 30 trillion tonnes representing a mass of more than 50 kilogrammes for every square metre of the Earth's surface.
 
"Humans and human organisations form part of it, too - although we are not always as much in control as we think we are, as the technosphere is a system, with its own dynamics and energy flows – and humans have to help keep it going to survive," Jan Zalasiewicz of University of Leicester said.
 
The Anthropocene concept - a proposed epoch highlighting the impact humans have made to the planet - has provided an understanding that humans have greatly changed the Earth.
 
"The technosphere can be said to have budded off the biosphere and arguably is now at least partly parasitic on it. At its current scale the technosphere is a major new phenomenon of this planet - and one that is evolving extraordinarily rapidly," Williams said.
 
"Compared with the biosphere, though, it is remarkably poor at recycling its own materials, as our burgeoning landfill sites show. This might be a barrier to its further success - or halt it altogether," said Williams.
 
The researchers believe the technosphere is some measure of the extent to which we have reshaped our planet.
 
"There is more to the technosphere than just its mass," said Colin Waters from the Leicester's Department of Geology.
 
"It has enabled the production of an enormous array of material objects, from simple tools and coins, to ballpoint pens, books and CDs, to the most sophisticated computers and smartphones.
 
"Many of these, if entombed in strata, can be preserved into the distant geological future as 'technofossils' that will help characterise and date the Anthropocene," said Waters.
 
If technofossils were to be classified as palaeontologists classify normal fossils - based on their shape, form and texture - the study suggests that the number of individual types of 'technofossil' now on the planet likely reaches a billion or more - thus far outnumbering the numbers of biotic species now living. The study was published in the journal Anthropocene Review.
 
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Element 117 officially named 'Tennessine'
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Soon, you can demote group admins on WhatsApp  
Regular yoga can slow down ageing of brain: Study  
What are haemorrhoids (piles) and what causes them?  
WhatsApp facilitates quick switch from voice to video call  
The Thin and Light Lenovo Ideapad 720s shines at Digit Zero 1 Awards  
Frequent heartburns up cancer risk in older adults  
Blueberry vinegar can help fight dementia  
iPhones with older batteries will take a hit in performance: Apple  
Eighth planet found in faraway solar system, matching ours  
Google brings a host of new features on Pixel 2  
Scientists turn beer into suitable petrol  
Space gives a sense of humbleness: NASA astronaut  
Researchers discover genes to prolong human life  
Google announces best apps of 2017  
This technology can help to reduce accidents on icy roads  
Yepzon launches in India; promises smart safety solutions  
Soon, you'll be able to control diabetes with your phone  
Turning bacteria into 'world's smallest tape recorders'  
How breastmilk protects babies from food allergy decoded  
Stars among the oldest in our galaxy discovered  
Apple delays release of smart speaker - HomePod  
Owning a dog may add years to your life  
'Textisms' actually add meaning to written words  
Sugar may heal wounds, says study  
Heart-stopping sex? It's rare  
 
Do you support withdrawal of Haj subsidy?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy