Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
October 19, Thursday 2017 4:23 PM       

       HEADLINES: Dileep offers prayers at Sabarimala                                              Saritha lodges complaint against former SIT                                              There’s no boundary for love, inter-caste marriages should be encouraged: HC                                              CPM leader GD Nair passes away                                              Dileep forged fake medical documents: Police                                              MSRTC strike enters third day                                              Air quality in Delhi reaches hazardous level                                              Taj Mahal may meet the same fate as Babri Masjid: Azam Khan                                              Modi to celebrate Diwali with army soldiers in Gurez                                              Dogs in Nepal get VIP treatment on second day of Tihar                                              Brazil drub Honduras 3-0, face Germany in quarterfinals                                              Katsumi hopes to win maiden I-League for East Bengal                                              De Villiers hits 176 as South Africa score 353/6 vs B'desh                                              Ish Sodhi replaces injured Todd Astle in NZ squad                                              PV Sindhu bows out of Denmark Open                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Coconut sized tumor removed from Iraqi woman's head  
       New, rare galaxy spotted over 359 mln light-years away
 
         Posted on :15:51:09 Jan 4, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:15:51:09 Jan 4, 2017
         Tags: New, rare galaxy, 359 mln light-years away
 
WASHINGTON: Scientists have for the first time observed a rare galaxy with two outer rings surrounding a red core located about 359 million light-years away from Earth.
 
The galaxy named PGC 1000714 appears to belong to a class of rarely observed, Hoag-type galaxies.
 
It has a well-defined elliptical-like core surrounded by two circular rings.
"Less than 0.1 per cent of all observed galaxies are Hoag-type galaxies," said Burcin Mutlu-Pakdil, a graduate student at University of Minnesota in the US.
 
Hoag-type galaxies are round cores surrounded by a circular ring, with nothing visibly connecting them. The majority of observed galaxies are disc-shaped like our own Milky Way. Galaxies with unusual appearances give astronomers unique insights into how galaxies are formed and change.
 
The researchers collected multi-waveband images of the galaxy, which is only easily observable in the Southern Hemisphere, using a large diameter telescope in the Chilean mountains.
 
These images were used to determine the ages of the two main features of the galaxy, the outer ring and the central body.
 
While the researchers found a blue and young (0.13 billion years) outer ring, surrounding a red and older (5.5 billion years) central core, they were surprised to uncover evidence for second inner ring around the central body.
 
To document this second ring, researchers took their images and subtracted out a model of the core. This allowed them to observe and measure the obscured, second inner ring structure.
 
"We've observed galaxies with a blue ring around a central red body before, the most well-known of these is Hoag's object. However, the unique feature of this galaxy is what appears to be an older diffuse red inner ring," said Patrick Treuthardt, an astrophysicist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
 
Galaxy rings are regions where stars have formed from colliding gas.
"The different colors of the inner and outer ring suggest that this galaxy has experienced two different formation periods," Mutlu-Pakdil said.
 
"From these initial single snapshots in time, it's impossible to know how the rings of this particular galaxy were formed," she said.
 
The researchers said that by accumulating snapshot views of other galaxies like this one astronomers can begin to understand how unusual galaxies are formed and evolve.
 
While galaxy shapes can be the product of internal or external environmental interactions, researchers speculate that the outer ring may be the result of this galaxy incorporating portions of a once nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy.
 
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Coconut sized tumor removed from Iraqi woman's head
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Stress as unhealthy as junk food  
Planet Nine does exist in solar system: NASA  
Blame these hormones if your dog is getting aggressive  
Save big on Infinix Note 4, Hot 4 Pro during Flipkart's 'Big Diwali Sale'  
Even modest exposure to oil can harm coastal, marine birds  
Starfish, anemones protect ecosystems from climate change  
Skipping breakfast may help to shed those extra kilos  
Dozing off during lecture? Blame your neurons  
Google's Pixel 2 promotes safe driving through automatic 'do not disturb' mode  
Researchers create molecule that could kill HIV  
Google unveils new moves to boost struggling news organizations  
Here's how zebrafish get its stripes  
Facebook to introduce facial recognition for account security  
LG launches smartphone to 'keep mosquitos at bay'  
New spider species named after DiCaprio, Obama  
Astrophysicists make music from Saturn's moons, rings  
Rooter includes Kabbadi, F1 under one roof  
Orbiting supermassive black holes discovered for first time  
Theweightmonitor.com launches mobile app for easier access to one-stop weight management platform  
New drug to treat blood cancer developed  
Threat of asteroid impact looming over Earth: experts  
Hottest known planet in universe discovered  
Wireless, battery-less pacemaker developed  
'Manned missions to Moon, Mars may face medical emergencies'  
Ransomware threat: Centre activates mechanism to prevent ‘Wannacry’ cyber attack  
 
Is there any logic in making Dileep the first accused in the actress attack case?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy