Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
November 19, Sunday 2017 9:30 PM       

       HEADLINES: Attack on Mayor: Case charged for murder attempt                                              What are principles should be discussed, Kanam’s reply to Kodiyeri                                              CM calls on Mayor V K Prasanth                                              CPM activist attacked in Kattakada                                              Attack towards mayor deliberate, says Pinarayi                                              'Padmavati' release date deferred amid controversy                                              210 govt websites made public Aadhaar details: UIDAI                                              Modi reiterates importance of sanitation on World Toilet Day                                              Twitter suspends verified Pak Defense handle for faking Indian picture                                              Ranji Trophy: Sanju Samson hits ton as Kerala close in on victory                                              Afghan thrashes Pak to win U19 Asia Cup                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: ISRO to launch record 104 satellites on Feb 15  
       Over 100 new potential planets spotted
 
         Posted on :16:18:47 Feb 14, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:16:18:47 Feb 14, 2017
         Tags: Over 100 new potential planets, spotted
 
WASHINGTON: Scientists have detected more than 100 new potential exoplanets, including one orbiting a star about 8.1 light years away from the Earth, using one of the most successful techniques for spotting alien worlds.
 
Astronomers released the largest-ever compilation of exoplanet-detecting observations made using a technique called the radial velocity method.
 
The radial velocity method takes advantage of the fact that the planet's gravity also affects the star. Astronomers are able to use sophisticated tools to detect the tiny wobble the planet induces as its gravity tugs on the star.
 
The virtual mountain of data was gathered as part of a two-decade radial velocity planet-hunting programme that uses a spectrometer called HIRES, mounted on the 10-metre Keck-I telescope of the W M Keck Observatory atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
The compilation includes almost 61,000 individual measurements made of more than 1,600 stars.
 
By making the data public, the team is offering unprecedented access to one of the best exoplanet searches in the world.
 
"HIRES was not specifically optimised to do this type of exoplanet detective work, but has turned out to be a workhorse instrument of the field," said Steve Vogt of the University of California Santa Cruz in the US, who built the instrument.
 
Now as the survey moves into its third decade, the team members have decided it is time to clean house. With so much data at hand and a limited amount of time, they recognised that more exoplanets would be found by sharing their catalogue with the exoplanet community.
 
Mikko Tuomi of the University of Hertfordshire in the UK led a sophisticated statistical analysis of the large data set to tease out the periodic signals most likely to be planets.
 
"We were very conservative in this paper about what counts as an exoplanet candidate and what does not, and even with our stringent criteria, we found over 100 new likely planet candidates," Tuomi said.
 
One of these probable planets is around a star called GJ 411, also known as Lalande 21185. It is the fourth-closest star to our own Sun and is only about 40 per cent the mass of the Sun. The planet has a very short orbital period of just under 10 days, so it is no Earth-twin.
 
However, the planet, GJ 411b, continues a trend that has been seen in the overall population of detected exoplanets: the smallest planets are found around the smallest stars.
 
The team is hoping their decision will lead to a flurry of new science, as astronomers around the globe combine the HIRES data with their own existing observations, or mount new observing campaigns to follow up on potential signals.
 
The catalogue release is part of a growing trend in exoplanet science to broaden the audience and discovery space, which has emerged in part to handle the aftermath of follow-up discoveries by NASA's Kepler and K2 missions.
The research appears in The Astronomical Journal.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: ISRO to launch record 104 satellites on Feb 15
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Owning a dog may add years to your life  
'Textisms' actually add meaning to written words  
Sugar may heal wounds, says study  
Heart-stopping sex? It's rare  
Over 1.3 lakh Indians 'book ticket' to Mars  
China all set to make first contact with aliens  
Greenland Ice sheet could be losing mass, says study  
'Flying taxis' could be a thing by 2020  
When art comes to the rescue of depressed patients  
Here's a mechanism that can help you get rid of bad memories  
2017 ozone hole smallest since 1988: NASA  
Marijuana can dull the brain in some HIV patients  
We use lesser brainpower than thought  
You can soon delete 'sent messages' on WhatsApp  
There is a connection between nose and emotions  
75% of pet reptiles die within a year: Study  
Gamma rays will reach beyond limits of light: Researchers  
Suicide molecules may help combat cancer: Study  
Aspirin a day may keep liver cancer away  
Clearing the myths about osteoporosis  
Stress as unhealthy as junk food  
Planet Nine does exist in solar system: NASA  
Blame these hormones if your dog is getting aggressive  
Save big on Infinix Note 4, Hot 4 Pro during Flipkart's 'Big Diwali Sale'  
Even modest exposure to oil can harm coastal, marine birds  
 
Do you support reservation for all economically bacward people?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy