Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
March 29, Wednesday 2017 8:54 AM       

       HEADLINES: Goons attack cinema producer in Kochi                                              Parl passes bill that decriminalises suicide attempt by mentally ill people                                              No legal slaughterhouse is being targetted in UP: Naidu                                              Kundan Chandravat who announced bounty for Pinarayi's head held                                              Sena MP books AI ticket, airline cancels it                                              China's military facilities on man-made SCS islands nearly ready                                              Snapping of Indo-Pak talks only encourages terrorists: Pak                                              Pakistan court asks Punjab govt to explain detention of Hafiz Saeed                                              India beat Australia to win series 2-1                                              India retains ICC Test Championship mace                                              Ashwin receives Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy                                              Bhupathi picks four singles players; Paes, Bopanna reserves                                              Aussie cricketers are no longer friends, says Virat Kohli                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: US man receives new face from donor  
       Juno to remain in current orbit around Jupiter: NASA
 
         Posted on :19:37:10 Feb 20, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:19:37:10 Feb 20, 2017
         Tags: Juno to remain in current orbit around Jupite
 
WASHINGTON: NASA's solar-powered Juno spacecraft, which has been probing Jupiter since July last year, will remain in its current 53-day orbit around the gas giant planet for the remainder of its mission.
 
This will allow Juno to accomplish its science goals, while avoiding the risk of a previously-planned engine firing that would have reduced the spacecraft's orbital period to 14 days, NASA said.
 
"Juno is healthy, its science instruments are fully operational, and the data and images we have received are nothing short of amazing," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate.
 
"The decision to forego the burn is the right thing to do - preserving a valuable asset so that Juno can continue its exciting journey of discovery," said Zurbuchen.
 
Juno has successfully orbited Jupiter four times since arriving at the giant planet, with the most recent orbit completed on February 2. Its next close flyby of Jupiter will be on March 27.
 
The orbital period does not affect the quality of the science collected by Juno on each flyby, since the altitude over Jupiter will be the same at the time of closest approach.
 
The longer orbit provides new opportunities that allow further exploration of the far reaches of space dominated by Jupiter's magnetic field, increasing the value of Juno's research, NASA said.
 
During each orbit, Juno soars low over Jupiter's cloud tops - as close as about 4,100 kilometres. During these flybys, Juno probes beneath the obscuring cloud cover and studies Jupiter's auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.
 
The original Juno flight plan envisioned the spacecraft looping around Jupiter twice in 53-day orbits, then reducing its orbital period to 14 days for the remainder of the mission.
 
However, two helium check valves that are part of the plumbing for the spacecraft's main engine did not operate as expected when the propulsion system was pressurised in October.
 
Telemetry from the spacecraft indicated that it took several minutes for the valves to open, while it took only a few seconds during past main engine firings.
 
"During a thorough review, we looked at multiple scenarios that would place Juno in a shorter-period orbit, but there was concern that another main engine burn could result in a less-than-desirable orbit," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
 
"The bottom line is a burn represented a risk to completion of Juno's science objectives," said Nybakken. Juno's larger 53-day orbit allows for "bonus science" that was not part of the original mission design.
 
Juno will further explore the far reaches of the Jovian magnetosphere - the region of space dominated by Jupiter's magnetic field - including the far magnetotail, the southern magnetosphere, and the magnetospheric boundary region called the magnetopause.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: US man receives new face from donor
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Trump plans to send humans to Mars  
First patient cured of rare blood disorder'  
Indian-American teen wins top science award worth USD 250,000  
'New extension may improve inflight WiFi'  
Frogs can see colour in extreme darkness: study  
NASA may put astronauts on deep space test flight  
Juno to remain in current orbit around Jupiter: NASA  
US man receives new face from donor  
Over 100 new potential planets spotted  
ISRO to launch record 104 satellites on Feb 15  
Now, video-makers can live stream on YouTube  
Music, drugs stimulate same part of brain: study  
Facebook adds tool for helping in times of crisis  
Moon may have formed from collision of tiny 'moonlets'  
China to set up world's highest altitude telescopes in Tibet  
NASA to launch two robotic probes to study early solar system  
After Mars, ISRO eyes Venus and Jupiter  
New, rare galaxy spotted over 359 mln light-years away  
Coconut sized tumor removed from Iraqi woman's head  
Bacteria-powered battery built on single sheet of paper  
'Human-made objects on Earth amount to 30 trillion tonnes'  
Element 117 officially named 'Tennessine'  
Predatory bacteria may wipe out 'superbugs': study  
New potent vaccine may spell end for HIV  
Water exists deeper in Earth than thought: study  
 
Do you think TV expose on minister's private talk was justifiable?
yes
 
no
 
don't know
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy