Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
August 18, Friday 2017 2:50 AM       

       HEADLINES: New five collectors appointed                                              P J Kurien hoists Indian Flag at Vietnam                                              BJP former councilor dies in Sharjah                                              Complaint against Chandrabose murder case accused Nisham                                              Permission granted to Water Theme Park revoked                                              Maneka Gandhi seeks Sushma Swaraj's intervention to rescue minor married to Omani sheikh                                              China rejects US criticism on religious freedom                                              "UK working closely with India in tackling terrorism"                                              US designates Hizbul Mujahideen as foreign terrorist group                                              India beat Austria 4-3 to end Europe tour on a high                                              Mirza advances, Paes crashes out of Cincinnati Masters                                              ICC U-19 World Cup: Windies to take on Kiwis in opener                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       WORLD Next Article: Sharif, army chief say won't come under any pressure on Jadhav  
       US experts questions Pak's decision to execute Jadhav
 
         Posted on :21:59:05 Apr 12, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:21:59:05 Apr 12, 2017
         Tags: US experts questions Pak's decision to execu
 
WASHINGTON: Top US experts have expressed concern over Pakistan's decision to give death penalty to Indian national Kulbhushan Jadhav as they warned that Islamabad wants to send a "strong message" to India against isolating it on the world stage. Jadhav, 46, was awarded the death sentence by military Field General Court Martial under the army act for his alleged involvement in terrorism and espionage. The death sentence was confirmed by army chief Gen Qamar Javed Bajwa.
 
"Apart from the gross irregularities in the Jadhav situation, such as the lack of consular access and the secrecy surrounding the surprise court-martial, what struck me the most is the contrast between the speed of Mr Jadhav's trial set against the endless postponements for that of the Mumbai attackers,” Alyssa Ayres, a former senior State Department official in its South and Central Asia Bureau said.
 
"The latter case, by contrast, has been in a continual state of prolongation for nearly nine years,” Ayres told PTI. She is currently senior fellow for India, Pakistan and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations, a top American think-tank.
 
Bharat Gopalaswamy, director of South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council, a Washington-DC based top US think-tank, believes that the evidence warranting Jadhav's conviction "is rather flimsy" and the story by the Pakistani authorities "do not add up".
 
Without furnishing further evidence, this conviction as it stands, "seems to be politically motivated" in order to counter India's aggressive diplomacy against Pakistan in combating terrorism, he said.
 
"This whole story is shrouded in mystery and uncertainty, but it seems clear that Pakistan wants to send a very strong message to India, whether to warn New Delhi against meddling in Pakistan or to push back in a big way against India's efforts to isolate Pakistan on the world stage," said Michael Kugelman, deputy director and senior associate for South Asia at the prestigious Woodrow Wilson Center.
 
"At the same time, given how much India will want to ensure that Yadav isn't executed, Pakistan now has a very large bargaining chip at its disposal. Pakistan may want to use Yadav as a trump card to get some type of major concession from India," Kugelman said.
 
"The bottom line is that India-Pakistan relations are on life support. We can kiss goodbye any immediate prospects for resuming dialogue, though that wasn't a very strong possibility even before the announcement about Yadav’s death sentence. Ultimately, India and Pakistan face some very dark and dangerous days ahead,” he said.
 
According to Sameer Lalwani, senior associate and deputy director for Stimson's South Asia program, said the decision and timing of Jadhav's execution sentence "appears puzzling" because in many ways it does not seem to work in Pakistan’s self-interest.
 
"If Jadhav posed a threat and Pakistan wanted to send a deterrent signal to potential saboteurs of CPEC and Gwadar, they could have executed him months ago after his intelligence value had been exhausted," Lalwani said.
 
"If Pakistan wanted to exploit Jadhav's capture for diplomatic purposes by showcasing evidence of Indian sub conventional aggression, Pakistan still has yet to convince the international community and an execution raises suspicions," Lalwani said.
 
"Finally, if the Indians care that much about Jadhav, Pakistan could have used him as a bargaining chip. Perhaps the sentence is an opening bargaining gambit but actuallyexecuting Jadhavmay not be reaping much of a deterrent signal for Pakistan while foreclosing on diplomatic or trade value,” he said.
 
Both the State Department and the White House refused to comment on the sentencing of Jadhav. "We have seen these reports. We refer you to the governments of India and Pakistan for further information," a State Department spokesperson said. 
A A
       WORLD
Next Article: Sharif, army chief say won't come under any pressure on Jadhav
 
 
WORLD HEADLINES
Barcelona terror attack: local media says at least 13 dead  
US designates Hizbul Mujahideen as foreign terrorist group  
"UK working closely with India in tackling terrorism"  
China rejects US criticism on religious freedom  
Guam Radio Stations accidentally trigger emergency alert  
Three British men jailed, caned for sexual assault  
China, Pak partners of strategic cooperation: Wang  
Massive mudslide in Sierra Leone, over 200 dead  
Pak hoists 'largest' national flag to mark 70th I-Day  
Venezuela calls Trump's warning 'crazy act'  
Strong earthquake of magnitude 6.4 jolts Indonesia's Sumatra  
World's oldest man, a Holocaust survivor, dies at 113  
Satellite images show N Korea testing submarine missile  
Blast targeting military vehicle kills 15 people in Quetta  
China earthquake: Death toll rises to 24  
28 killed, 80 injured after two trains collide in Egypt  
US Military 'locked and loaded' to face Pyongyang provocation: Trump  
Doklam standoff: China rejects reports of offering to relocate troops  
India giving signs for possible military clashes: State Media  
UK homeless population may double by 2041: Crisis report  
Trump slams McConnell for ObamaCare repeal failure  
Pak's ISI wanted Taliban leader Mansour to destroy schools, roads in Afghan  
4 Pak Army personnel killed in clashes with militants  
China earthquake: Death toll rises to 13  
Khaleda Zia gets permanent bail in graft case  
 
Do you think Pulsar Suni's Madam is a spoof?
yes
 
no
 
don't know
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy